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Paternity

Colorado recently adopted the Uniform Parentage Act, which ensures that either parent has the ability to request that the father’s paternity be established. Once the paternity test has been taken and the results have been submitted to the courts, if Colorado Family Law Court sees that the alleged father is the actual father, then orders will be issued in reference to parental rights and responsibilities. With so many complex issues, Colorado paternity is a complicated aspect of family law. Common paternity issues that can complicate matters include genetic testing, the named father on the birth certificate, the marital status of the mother, acknowledgment of paternity and the age of the child in question.

The El Paso County Child Support Enforcement Unit works to assist in establishing paternity, in some cases. However, these purposes are normally for child support purposes only. Therefore, The County Child support Enforcement Unit can’t become in matters that are in reference to parenting rights or responsibilities. The only viable option for these issues are a Colorado Family law attorney that is familiar with paternity law legalities.

Having Colorado paternity established is important no matter the relationship between the parents. Even if the father and mother get along, it is still important for paternity to be established through the courts. Having paternity established will ensure that the bond and relationship between father and son is legally binding, which give the father access to paternal rights. If a disagreement ever arises, this paternity can make sure that the parent with primary custody of the child obtains child support payments. This will also ensure that the child is accurately aware of the identity of both parents.

Acknowledgment of paternity can be voluntarily declared by both parties. This acknowledgment is legally binding and establishes paternity of the child in question. However, acknowledgment of paternity is not completely legally binding until after sixty days have passed. Simple acknowledgment of paternity doesn’t establish actual child support amounts or parenting rights. This is simply an acknowledgment of paternity only. A family lawyer must be used to establish child support amounts and paternal rights.

In order to have your name on the actual birth certificate of the child, Colorado mandates that a father who is not married to the mother must acknowledge paternity. This ensures that the father is not able to challenge paternity at a later date. Therefore, before you sign a birth certificate, you must be sure that you are the actual father of the child in question.

The content of this page is for general informational purposes only, and should not be considered advice in your case. If you’re getting a divorce, you need a Denver divorce attorney who knows the intricacies of divorce in Colorado and the details of the law.

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